Leading gynecologic cancer care in South Texas.

Gynecologic oncologists focus on cancers of the female reproductive tract and have extensive training and experience handling a variety of diagnoses with the utmost respect and professionalism.

Well-trained gynecologic oncologists to fight your cancer.

In order to be considered a gynecologic oncologist, doctors must complete their residency in obstetrics and gynecology before undergoing a specialized fellowship in gynecologic oncology. And these stringent requirements are only the beginning of START’s rigorous selection process, which allows us to ensure your cancer treatment is conducted by some of the best doctors the medical field has to offer.

The scope of gynecologic oncology.

There are six areas of the female reproductive tract that make up the field of gynecologic oncology, and each area has its own strategy for treatment. Unfortunately, cancer is not a single disease that requires a single approach — but fortunately, we’ve gathered some of the most talented doctors in cancer care who are well versed in the challenges of every area of gynecologic oncology. Those areas include cancer of the…

  • Ovaries
  • Uterus
  • Vagina
  • Cervix
  • Vulva
  • Fallopian tubes

Stopping gynecologic cancer starts with you.

Fortunately, there are a number of steps you can take to decrease your risk of gynecologic cancer, or catch it early when it can be treated most effectively:

Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine

HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection that has been linked to cervical, vaginal and vulvar cancers. It’s recommended that you receive three doses of the vaccine before any sexual contact in order to prevent infection.

Pap test

Unfortunately only cervical cancer has a screening method for detecting precancerous cells, called a Pap test (also known as a Pap smear). During a Pap test, your doctor removes cells from your cervix and examines them under a microscope for abnormalities. For women age 21-29, it’s recommended that you get a Pap test every three years. For women age 29-65, you should get a Pap test every five years along with an HPV test or every three years without an HPV test.

HPV test

If you’re under age 30, you generally only need an HPV test if your Pap test indicates cell changes that could be precancerous. If you’re over age 30, we recommend getting an HPV test with your Pap test.

Know the symptoms

Because only cervical cancer has a screening test, it’s important to know the symptoms of the different gynecologic cancers. Some common symptoms include:

  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge
  • Pelvic pain or pressure
  • Abdominal or back pain
  • Bloating
  • Changes in bathroom habits
  • Itching or burning of the vulva
  • Changes in vulva color or skin, such as a rash, sores or warts

Choose START, the standard for gynecologic oncology
in South Texas.

Our gynecologic oncologists offer the specialized expertise, leading-edge technology and deep compassion that you would expect from a world-class cancer care center like START. Not only do we offer unsurpassed cancer treatment, we also strive to benefit worldwide cancer care through Phase I clinical trials. Visit the START Center to see our mission first-hand and experience the excellent care we’re known for.

Be proactive about cancer. For more information, or to schedule an appointment with a START Center gynecologic oncologist, call 210-745-6841. You can also schedule an appointment using our easy online form.